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Handmade Roof Tiles in Surrey

Handmade Roof Tiles

When you want only the very best handmade roof tiles, Heritage Clay Tiles Ltd are the company that delivers first time, every time. Our dedicated team of professionals have over fifty years of roofing industry experience, you really could not ask for a better product range or customer service experience when ordering from us.

Heritage Clay Tiles Ltd have a fantastic team of professionals who we are extremely proud of. They know the roofing tile industry inside out and are always on hand to take your enquiries, orders and help in any way they can to ensure that your build goes smoothly and according to plan, whilst remaining firmly within your budget.

We are the United Kingdoms premier supplier of high quality handmade roof tiles, peg tiles and machine made tiles. We have the reputation for delivering on our promise to our valued customers that other tile companies can only try to emulate.

Our handmade roof tiles are manufactured using very traditional skills when coupled with modern kiln technology, the Heritage Tile range is the best money can buy. Our unique service offers our customers the sort of tiles that will set their project apart from the rest.

We stock a very wide colour choice, including innovative shades and custom built styles of handmade roof tiles. This gives the architect, builder or homeowner complete peace of mind when creating the perfect design that will enhance any building project. Why not check out the tile blending tool on our website, we think you will find it a very useful method of achieving the perfect blend of handmade roof tiles.

A little information about Surrey

Modern Surrey history

Prior to the Great Reform Act of 1832, Surrey returned fourteen Members of Parliament, two representing the county and two each from the six boroughs of Bletchingley, Gatton, Guildford, Haslemere, Reigate and Southwark. For two centuries before the Reform Act, the dominant political network in Surrey was that of the Onslows of Clandon Park, a gentry family established in the county from the early 17th century, who were raised to the peerage in 1716. Members of the family won at least one of two county seats in Surrey, all but three of the thirty general elections between 1628 and 1768, while they took one or both of the seats for their local borough of Guildford in every election from 1660 to 1830, usually representing the Whig Party after its emergence in the late 1670s. Successive heads of the family held the post of Lord Lieutenant of Surrey continuously from 1716 to 1814.

Until the modern era Surrey, apart from its northeastern corner, was quite sparsely populated in comparison with many other parts of southern England, and remained quite rustic despite its short distance to London. Communications began to improve, and the influence of London to increase, with the development of turnpike roads and a stagecoach system in the 18th century. A far more important transformation followed with the arrival of the railways, beginning by the end of the 1830s.

Transport and the commuter in Surrey

The availability of rapid transport enabled prosperous London workers to settle all across Surrey and travel daily to work in the capital. This phenomenon of commuting brought explosive growth to the Surrey population and wealth, and tied its economy and society closely to London.

There was rapid expansion in existing towns like Guildford, Farnham, and most spectacularly Croydon, while new towns such as Woking and Redhill emerged beside the railway lines. The huge numbers of incomers to the county and the transformation of rural, farming communities into a commuter belt contributed to a decline in the traditional local culture, including the gradual demise of the distinctive Surrey dialect. This may have survived among the Surrey men into the late 19th Century, but is now lost in time.

At this time London itself spread quickly across north eastern Surrey. In 1800 it extended only to Vauxhall; one hundred years later the growth had reached as far as Putney and Streatham. This expansion was reflected in the creation of the County of London in 1889, detaching the areas subsumed by the city from Surrey. The expansion of London continued in the 20th century, engulfing Croydon, Kingston and many smaller settlements. This led to a further contraction of Surrey in 1965 with the creation of Greater London, under the London Government Act 1963; however, Staines and Sunbury on Thames, previously in Middlesex, were transferred to Surrey, extending the county across the Thames. Surrey boundaries were altered again in 1974 when Gatwick Airport was transferred to West Sussex.

The United Kingdoms first crematorium in Surrey

In 1849 Brookwood Cemetery was established near Woking to serve the population of London, connected to the capital by its own railway service. It soon developed into the largest burial ground in the world. Woking was also the site of Britains first ever crematorium, which opened in 1878, and its first mosque, founded in 1889. In 1881 Godalming became the first town in the world with a public electricity supply.

The eastern part of Surrey was transferred from the Diocese of Winchester to that of Rochester in 1877. In 1905 this area was separated to form a new Diocese of Southwark. The rest of the county, together with part of eastern Hampshire, was separated from Winchester in 1927 to become the Diocese of Guildford, whose cathedral was consecrated in 1961.

Architecture and industry in Surrey

During the later 19th century Surrey became important in the development of architecture in Britain and the wider world. Its traditional building forms made a significant contribution to the revival architecture associated with the Arts and Crafts Movement, and would exert a lasting influence. The prominence of Surrey peaked in the 1890s, when it was the focus for globally important developments in domestic architecture, in particular work that was influenced by traditional styles and materials.

The late 19th and early 20th centuries saw the demise of long lived Surrey industries that had been manufacturing paper and gunpowder. Most of the counties paper mills closed in the years after 1870, and the last survivor closed in 1928. Gunpowder production fell victim to the First World War, which brought about a huge expansion of the British munitions industry, followed by sharp contraction and consolidation when the war ended, leading to the closure of the Surrey powder mills.

New industrial developments included the establishment of the vehicle manufacturers Dennis Brothers in Guildford in 1895. Beginning as a maker of bicycles and then of cars, the firm soon shifted into the production of commercial and utility vehicles, becoming internationally important as a manufacturer of fire engines and buses, we still see Dennis on the front grill of fire engines to this very day. Though much reduced in size and despite multiple changes of ownership, this business continues to operate in Guildford. Kingston and nearby Ham became a centre of aircraft manufacturing, with the establishment in 1912 of the Sopwith Aviation Company and in 1920 of its successor H.G. Hawker Engineering, which later became Hawker Aviation and then Hawker Siddeley.

The war effort

During the Second World War a section of the GHQ Stop Line, a system of pillboxes, gun emplacements, anti tank obstacles and other fortifications, was constructed along the North Downs. This line, running from Somerset to Yorkshire, was intended as the principal fixed defence of London and the industrial core of England against the threat of invasion. German invasion plans envisaged that the main thrust of their advance inland would cross the North Downs at the gap in the ridge formed by the Wey valley, thus colliding with the defence line around Guildford.

Between the wars Croydon Airport, opened in 1920, served as the main airport for London, but it was superseded after the Second World War by Heathrow, and closed in 1959. Gatwick Airport, where commercial flights began in 1933, expanded greatly in the 1950s and 1960s, but the area occupied by the airport was transferred from Surrey to West Sussex in 1974.

Products available from Heritage Clay Tiles Ltd in East Sussex

Clay Roof Tiles in East Sussex

Clayhall Roof Tiles in East Sussex

Conservation Roof Tiles in East Sussex

Edwardian Roof Tiles in East Sussex

Georgian Roof Tiles in East Sussex

Handmade Clay Tiles in East Sussex

Handmade Roof Tiles in East Sussex

High Quality Roof Tiles in East Sussex

Traditional clay tiles in East Sussex

Traditional roof tiles in East Sussex

Products available from Heritage Clay Tiles Ltd in Essex

Clay Roof Tiles in Essex

Clayhall Roof Tiles in Essex

Conservation Roof Tiles in Essex

Edwardian Roof Tiles in Essex

Georgian Roof Tiles in Essex

Handmade Clay Tiles in Essex

Handmade Roof Tiles in Essex

High Quality Roof Tiles in Essex

Traditional clay tiles in Essex

Traditional roof tiles in Essex

Products available from Heritage Clay Tiles Ltd in Hampshire

Clay Roof Tiles in Hampshire

Clayhall Roof Tiles in Hampshire

Conservation Roof Tiles in Hampshire

Edwardian Roof Tiles in Hampshire

Georgian Roof Tiles in Hampshire

Handmade Clay Tiles in Hampshire

Handmade Roof Tiles in Hampshire

High Quality Roof Tiles in Hampshire

Traditional clay tiles in Hampshire

Traditional roof tiles in Hampshire

Products available from Heritage Clay Tiles Ltd in Hertfordshire

Clay Roof Tiles in Hertfordshire

Clayhall Roof Tiles in Hertfordshire

Conservation Roof Tiles in Hertfordshire

Edwardian Roof Tiles in Hertfordshire

Georgian Roof Tiles in Hertfordshire

Handmade Clay Tiles in Hertfordshire

Handmade Roof Tiles in Hertfordshire

High Quality Roof Tiles in Hertfordshire

Traditional clay tiles in Hertfordshire

Traditional roof tiles in Hertfordshire

Products available from Heritage Clay Tiles Ltd in Kent

Clay Roof Tiles in Kent

Clayhall Roof Tiles in Kent

Conservation Roof Tiles in Kent

Edwardian Roof Tiles in Kent

Georgian Roof Tiles in Kent

Handmade Clay Tiles in Kent

Handmade Roof Tiles in Kent

High Quality Roof Tiles in Kent

Traditional clay tiles in Kent

Traditional roof tiles in Kent

Products available from Heritage Clay Tiles Ltd in London

Clay Roof Tiles in London

Clayhall Roof Tiles in London

Conservation Roof Tiles in London

Edwardian Roof Tiles in London

Georgian Roof Tiles in London

Handmade Clay Tiles in London

Handmade Roof Tiles in London

High Quality Roof Tiles in London

Traditional clay tiles in London

Traditional roof tiles in London

Products available from Heritage Clay Tiles Ltd in Surrey

Clay Roof Tiles in Surrey

Clayhall Roof Tiles in Surrey

Conservation Roof Tiles in Surrey

Edwardian Roof Tiles in Surrey

Georgian Roof Tiles in Surrey

Handmade Clay Tiles in Surrey

High Quality Roof Tiles in Surrey

Traditional clay tiles in Surrey

Traditional roof tiles in Surrey

Products available from Heritage Clay Tiles Ltd in West Sussex

Clay Roof Tiles in West Sussex

Clayhall Roof Tiles in West Sussex

Conservation Roof Tiles in West Sussex

Edwardian Roof Tiles in West Sussex

Georgian Roof Tiles in West Sussex

Handmade Clay Tiles in West Sussex

Handmade Roof Tiles in West Sussex

High Quality Roof Tiles in West Sussex

Traditional clay tiles in West Sussex

Traditional roof tiles in West Sussex

Further Information

If you would like to know more or are interested in a quote we would be happy to help. Phone us on 01708 853 953, email us at sales@heritagetiles.co.uk and we will be in touch as soon as possible.

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Disclaimer - Images used on this website are for illustration purposes only and the end product may vary in colour. Samples are available on request.

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